Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: August 2007
Calcium Product 98G

title-blogronomist

Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: August 2007

  • Published in Calcium

Ag Lime Myths

A pound of lime is a pound of lime. It takes the same amount of lime to change pH no matter what form it is in. Pel lime doesn't have the lasting power that ag lime has. These are some comments made when people refer to pel lime. While they seem accurate, in truth they are costing you money.

Lime is not created equal. Lime is the generic term for calcium carbonate. Pure calcium carbonate is also called calcite. Lime on the other hand can vary in purity, form 50% to 175% CCE. Lime products that are over 100% generally contain elements such as Magnesium, or are considered hazardous, such as hydrated lime.

While it does take the same amount of calcium carbonate in a lab setting to neutralize low pH, in the field it is another situation. In order for lime to neutralize pH in needs to first be applied to the acid soil. Which is sometimes an impossible thing to achieve with a finely ground powder. Even on days when the wind is not blowing, applying ag lime with spinners launches the lime into the air, allowing it to drift for miles.

Once the lime gets to the soil it needs to be finely ground to achieve a pH change. Most ag lime is a 20-mesh average screen size. Lime that is meshed larger than 30 mesh will only be 5-50% effective the first year. After 4 years it will only be 15-50% effective. A product that is only 50% effective is an incredible waste of time and money.

 

 

 precision_ag_lime_3.JPG  
   Effective fine lime drifts, wasting you money  

 

The reason that ag lime seems to last long is, because of the mesh size, it doesn't breakdown and do much good for 3-4 years. What other ag input sells it self on not providing a return on investment for 3 -4 years? The fact is that none do.

Today's times of low margin, high cost inputs demands that your dollars work as hard as possible. Get yield response the first year, pH increase with every application. Make your high dollar fertilizers work for you. Don't let them be tied up by low pH. Feed the soil what it needs to stimulate

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!  

Read more...

Suggested light reading for the weekend!

The increase in the demand for fertilizers world-wide has drastically increased the cost of fertilizers. In addition to the cost, availability may be difficult in the coming years. Whether due to cost or availability many growers are looking for alternatives and products to improve yields with less NPK fertilizers. We would like to suggest humates.

Humate Benefits

Improved Water Retention, and water holding capacity
Humates can hold up to 20 times their weight in water.
Humic substances can enhance the release of fixed K from montmorillonite soils.
Addition of humic acids can increase P uptake by 25%.
Humic substances will increase length, and number of lateral roots, seedling growth after germination, nutrient availability and nutrient uptake.
These substances also affect a wide range of enzymatic processes.

Humates, play a vital role in soil fertility and plant nutrition. Plants grown on soils which contain adequate humates are less subject to stress, are healthier, produce higher yields, and the nutritional quality of feeds are superior. Humic substances are important in soil fertility and plant nutrition because of the part they play in the life cycle on earth. The life-death cycle involves a recycling of the carbon from plants to animals through the soil and air and back into the living plant.

Humates have been “forgotten “ when it was discovered that soluble acidic based N P and K fertilizers could stimulate plant growth. Continued use of these acidic fertilizers has decreased humic substances in the soil. This decrease is the main cause of leaching and erosion. Giving higher priority to soil humus and humates is a must to improve soil condition and yield.

Humic substances are recognized by most soil scientists and agronomists as the most important component of a healthy fertile soil. In addition, by understanding how these carbon containing substances function, professionals will have a solid foundation on which to design truly “complete” fertilizer recommendations.

Read Dr. Robert E Pettit's paper ORGANIC MATTER, HUMUS, HUMATE, HUMIC ACID, FULVIC ACID AND HUMIN: THEIR IMPORTANCE IN SOIL FERTILITY AND PLANT HEALTH
http://www.humates.com/pdf/ORGANICMATTERPettit.pdf 

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!  

Read more...

We want to hear from you

Good or bad, let us know what you think of our products. Is there something that can do to help your operation be more productive? Have a success story, let us know.

Click on comments, and then post a comment to let us know what you think of our products, our blog posts, or anything we can do to help you be more successful.

If you don’t want your comments posted on our site, go to about usand click on one of our names to send us an email. We are always looking for ways to improve SuperCal 98G, SuperCal SO4 and our company. Let us know what we can do to help you succeed in your business.

Calcium Products, lower input cost, higher yields, fist things first

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!  

Read more...

Improving Soil Quality

This week’s issue of Iowa Farmer Today features a guest opinion by Kendall Lamkey. The focus of the article is the decreasing quality of Iowa soil. We argree with most of the article; the soil is our number one resource, soil gets treated like dirt, Iowa soil is being depleted rapidly, and organic matter does not get enough focus.

He is also right on track that the degradation of the soil is linked to human health, plant production, and water quality. I am not sure that we necessarily need new approaches to preserve and maintain the soil. We need to do a better job of marketing the basics of fertility and soil management

Soil management is not easy, sexy, or exciting. There is no instant gratification like with tillage (which generally degrades the soil). There is no sense of accomplishment like watching the corn emerge through the soil. Understanding cations and anions takes more time than 0.7 x yield goal. Soil management is hard, that’s why most people ignore it.

Calcium Products is committed to helping you improve your soils. We have been doing it for over ten years. SuperCal 98G and SuperCal SO4 are key components to improving your soil. We have developed these products to make the old hard and difficult process of amending the soil easy and efficient. Keep checking back, we’ll continue to bring you information and ideas to improve your soil, yields, and bottom line.

Calcium Products, lower input costs, higher yields, better soils!

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!  

 

Read more...

The Silage Pit - Where your organic matter went

I as I drove across Iowa last week I couldn’t help but notice that there was a lot of silage being chopped. In some areas the corn was extremely good with yield estimates in the 220 range, while others areas yields were estimated at 70 bushels.

This fall will you treat the fields chopped for silage like the fields where just the grain was harvested? Will you adjust fertilizer rates in the sections of the fields that were chopped?

When 200-bushel corn is chopped for silage the following nutrients are removed.
Phosphate 120#      Potash 260#      Calcium 42#      Sulfur 32#

When 200-bushel corn is harvested for grain the following nutrients are removed.
Phosphate 70#        Potash 52#        Calcium 4#       Sulfur 14#

Chopping generally requires that the extra nutrients removed be replaced with increased fertilizer rates. Removing the stover removes 10x as much Ca, 5x as much K, 2x as much S, and 2x as much P. In addition to the nutrients lost, removal of up to 6 tons of stover can lead to a decrease of organic matter since it is not returned to the soil.

Please do not misunderstand; I am not against chopping corn for silage, there are many great benefits to it as a feed source. I am against poor soil. Soil that is low in nutrients such as calcium, sulfur, phosphate, and potash grow poor crops.

Low organic matter is the main cause for many other problems; compaction, poor structure, poor nutrient holding capacity, poor water holding capacity, erosion, crusting, diseases and carbon dioxide release. Crop residues are about 40% carbon. Residue turns into organic matter that releases CO2 throughout the growing season.

Having poor OM can short your corn crop the number one nutrient needed for growth (we’ll get into this more this winter).

The bottom line is SuperCal 98G is the best source for lime, and a great source of carbon dioxide. 100 pounds of 98G will supply all the calcium removed by chopping and supply some carbon that is removed as stover. SuperCal SO4 is a great source of soluble calcium and sulfur.

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!  

Read more...

Liming to Reduce Disease and Rot

With harvest fast approaching stalk quality is a hot topic. This time of year the only thing one can do to minimize loss from disease is harvest early. However it is time to take steps to reduce or prevent rots and disease for next year.

Now is the time to soil sample and plan lime applications.

Low pH may also be the cause of many stalk and stand problems. Having proper pH can reduce the amount and severity of diseases, while increasing the availability of nutrients already present in the soil. According to Plant Pathology, by George Nicholas Agrios, calcium reduces the severity of rhizoctonia, sclerotium (white mold), fusarium, and nematodes. The Plant Pathologist's Pocketbook states, calcium generally enhances resistance against disease, including post-harvest diseases.

Soil pH, calcium level, nitrogen form, and the availability of nutrients plays a major role in disease management. Adequate crop nutrition makes plants more tolerant of or resistant to disease. A direct correlation between adequate calcium levels, and pH, and decreasing levels of Fusarium occurrence has been established for a number of crops, including tomatoes, cotton, melons, and several ornamentals.

Too much phosphate can also be critical. Increasing phosphorus rates above the level needed to grow the crop can increase the severity of Fusarium wilt in certain crops. Avoid applying excessive levels of nitrogen. High N:K ratios have increased severity of many diseases. Work to maintain an adequate level of calcium and potassium in the soil

Don’t forget about fall-seeded crops.
In a study conducted by Washington State University, the incidence of Cephalosporium stripe decreased significantly when soil pH was raised from 5.1 to 6.0. Grain-yield and test weight increased significantly with increasing soil pH in three out of four years.
If you’re planning on sowing wheat, don’t forget to lime. SuperCal 98G can be used as a seed carrier to reduce lime costs, and increase yields.

Calcium Prodcuts, lower input costs, higher yields, less disease

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!  

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed
Blogronomist

ABOUT OUR BLOGRONOMIST PAGE

Maintained by our team of experts, we have a wide array of blog articles from our experts and guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming and growing tips, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

  1. Categories
  2. Archives

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007