Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: December 2008
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: December 2008

It costs more to not treat manure with SuperCal SO4

Beside the fact that you’re making “free”, or at least very cheap Ammonium sulfate fertilizer, treating your manure with SuperCal SO4 makes it cheaper to heat your buildings.
This is due to a simple rule of chemistry called
Specific Heat.

Specific Heat is the measure of the heat energy required to increase the temperature of a unit quantity of a substance by a certain temperature interval. In simple terms it is how much propane does it take to raise the temperature in your barn 1 degree.

When you use SuperCal SO4 to stabilize ammonia in the manure, it is not released to the atmosphere of the barn. The specific heat of ammonia gas is 1.55. Water’s specific heat is 1. Normal atmosphere is comprised of mainly Nitrogen (78%) and Oxygen (21%). The specific heat of Nitrogen gas is 0.777 and Oxygen is 1.33. Their combined specific heat is 0.885.

It takes 1.75 times more energy to heat ammonia as it does air! WOW!

Normal air has 78% Nitrogen, 21% Oxygen, 0.9% Argon, 0.03% Carbon Dioxide and the last 0.7% is comprised of 13 other elements. In poultry barns ammonia can quickly become the 5th or 6th most abundant element, when it should be the lest abundant. Ammonia levels can get as high as 220 ppm but generally range from 7 to 177 ppm

Simply put if it would take 88.5 gallons of propane to heat a barn with normal air content and it would take 155 gallons to heat a barn that is 125ppm ammonia. In barns that have high ammonia there is the added cost of running exhaust fans, and the cost of heating air only to have it sucked out.

You thought fertilizer was expensive!

There are also other costs of high ammonia:

During winter, when ventilation rates are low, the ammonia concentrations in many houses will exceed the levels recommended by industry groups of maximum 50 ppm at bird level. However Anderson et al. (1964) showed that ammonia levels as low as 20 ppm compromised the immune system of chickens, making them more susceptible to diseases and damaged the respiratory system of the birds.

Treating your manure with SuperCal SO4 will result in higher rates of gain and lower death loss.

Ammonia emission of more than 100 lb of ammonia per day per site triggers federal reporting requirements through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA). According to Iowa State you could be emitting 1.5 lbs to 11.66 lbs per hour of ammonia.

Treating your manure with SuperCal SO4 will keep the government and paper work out of your life.

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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  • Published in Soybeans

So what does Kip say about growing soybeans?

On Monday  I attended a meeting put on by International Ag Labs titled Soybean Summit - Pushing the Yields on Soybeans, in Fairmont, Minnesota.

I number of experienced agronomists spoke on many items. Here are some of the notes I took;

Drying soil when doing a lab analysis increases sulfur readings

Greatest soil S loss when K and Na are high

Stunted plants and uneven crop emergence can be caused by sulfur deficiency

2010 should be a bad white mold year for soybeans

Sencor can worsen white mold

If your roots are not bright white you do not have enough available calcium

May take 3 years to improve soils

P:K ratio of 1:1 for proper growth and to reduce weeds

To Control Insects:

Control Nitrate levels in the plant

Keep plant Sugar high

Keep available calcium high

Use the right form of phosphate for your soil

For Higher Yields on Beans

    1. Break Compaction
    2. Get oxygen into the soil
    3. Lime or Gypsum and apply manure
    4. Meet early needs of the plant
    5. Identify diseases and insect problems
    6. Foliar Feed

And what you been waiting for my notes from Kip's talk (In my words)

Crops should ripen with a green stalk, if not, you are not fertilizing properly

Accurate planting is key, drills do not do this

All seed emerging within 48 hour of the first plant

2" tall weeds remove 10% of yield that cannot be recovered

There was much more discussed but my key take-away was fertilize properly first, get your soil balanced and working then move on to other things. This was a great meeting for any farmer looking to improve yields. I highly suggest trying to make it to one of International Ag labs next meetings.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Why you should consider a fertilizer grade lime

If you need to lime your fields why would you choose a product that takes 7 years to pay you back? Times of uncertainty and poor prices call for better efficiency, quicker return on your investment and a sharper pencil. SuperCal 98G is fertilizer grade lime.

Ag lime is at best a 50% effective liming agent. That is on its best day, but what about the drift on application day and uneven spreading? What about the drift after application? What about the water that's in the ag lime when you bought it? How much water did you buy? What about the big boulders that show up in you lime load? In the field you might get 25% effectiveness from a ton of ag lime.

SuperCal 98G is proven to increase yield when applied with potash when lime is needed. Having the proper pH makes phosphorus more available. Having enough calcium in the soil increases root mass and improves plant health.

You're going to spend $5-10 per year on lime anyway, why would you wait until you have a problem to add lime? Maintain proper pH like you maintain proper P and K levels and make more money this year, not 7 years from now.

SuperCal 98G is a fertilizer grade lime, it is 98% pure calcium carbonate, ground extremely fine to make it a 91% effective liming agent. It is pelletized to standard fertilizer grade prills, making blending with all dry fertilizer easy. It's effectiveness means you get results in this cropping year.

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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  • Published in Calcium

Increasing Yields and Quality

For most of us in the Midwest, this is week will be one of the coldest and windiest of the year. For those of us that kind of like snow and winter sports, this is a little too much to take. Thoughts of the spring thaw and getting back to being outside in the sun working the land are hard to suppress.

So for those of you who cabin fever, garden or farm, here is a nice video from our fiends at International Ag Labs.

Bob Siems runs a small vegetable farm, hear in his own words how correcting soil problems has lead to huge increases in yields, and more importantly increases in quality of the produce and customer satisfaction.

Bob’s big increase is mainly due to the large increase in available calcium in his soil. While Bob is working with vegetable crops International Ag labs works with many row crop farmers and has proven success in helping to increase productivity by correcting soil problems.

Nice video guys!

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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  • Published in Corn

High Tech for High Yield

Greetings from the No-Till conference in Des Moines. I just listened to Fred Below talk about achieving 300 bushels. Unfortunately he has only done that once, back in 1985. From there he goes to show his current research using high tech products to try and reach those goals.

His recommended additions add an additional $125 to the cost of an acre and add between 14 and 66 bu/a.

My take away, high tech might be worth it, but if you don't have the basics right, your wasting you money. Fred echos this with you must to do better at the basic to hit high yields.

I will add to this in further blogs, got to catch the next session!

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Gypsum Reduces Phosphorus and Herbicide Loss

We just can't tell you all the great benefits of gypsum, so we get really excited when someone else presents information on gypsum.

One person who has done some great research is L. Darrell Norton of the National Soil Erosion Research Laboratory.

Darrell conducted a two-year demonstrating successful results in reducing runoff volumes in agricultural applications. Addition of Gypsum to the soil not only improved infiltration, but also reduced run-off concentrations of Phosphorous and Atrazine. The study concluded that use of the gypsum amendment during application of fertilizer and herbicide treatments is a practical management approach in making agriculture more sustainable with respect to surface water quality. The findings were presented at the 9th Biennial Conference on Stormwater Research and Watershed Management.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Does Cation Balancing Have a Place?

Balancing Soil Nutrient Levels in Agriculture

Soil tests provide some great information to producers and consultants.  They usually include such things as pH, buffer pH, and CEC along with nutrient levels like Phosphorus (P) and Potassium (K).  Some agronomists and producers look at the pH and then ignore everything else except for the recommendations based on yield.  This might not be the best strategy for long term soil health.

There are some people who advocate looking at the relative proportions of the cations (Hydrogen, Calcium, Potassium, Sodium, Magnesium) in the soil and trying to achieve a balanced level of fertility.  This would be equivalent to achieving a balanced livestock ration or human diet. 

A Virginia website which talks more about cation balancing can be found here:  www.vabf.org/soilre1.php. I think the author makes two very important points in the conclusion:

1) A foliar or tissue test will show what the plant is actually using.  This may be different than what a soil test indicates.

2) There is no substitute for the knowledge that a farmer has about the land he is managing. 

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

Read more...
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