Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: July 2009
Calcium Product 98G

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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: July 2009

Fall checklist

Harvest is underway in many areas, and will rapidly pick up speed in the next few weeks.  I (Glen) see other signs of fall as I travel these days.  The leaves are changing, the air has freshened, and fall application of fertilizer is underway. 

My fall checklist includes:

  1. Winterize all equipment
  2. Finish maintenance/pre-season inspections
  3. Review application lists & field maps
  4. Order SuperCal 98G & SO4

I anticipate a busy fall season for lime application, and have been encouraging dealers to bring in product as soon as they are able to do so.  I fully expect the fall movement to increase significantly in 1-2 weeks, just when the availability of trucks decreases.  Getting product in now allows for flexibility in inventory management, greater control over supply, and less chance of logistical challenges (i.e. less stress)!

Please be safe this fall.  Take a little extra time to remind others to be safe also.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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  • Published in Calcium

Calcium does not equal calcareous

During a recent workshop, a speaker talked about calcareous soil.  He mentioned that calcareous areas have an abundance of calcium.  That didn't sound right to me, since I remember from soils class that calcareous meant the presence of calcium carbonate, not calcium.

From Dr. John Sawyer, Iowa State University, calcareous soils:

  • have a pH of 7.2 to 8.5
  • contain various amounts of solid calcium carbonate (1 to 20% CaCO3 by weight)
  • CaCO3 controls soil pH
  • CaCO3 (solid) + 2 H+ = Ca+2 + CO2 + H2O

If calcium carbonate is present (as a solid), then how much soluble (i.e. plant available) calcium is there?  I don't know, but will be working to find out.  It seems to me, that it would be conceivable to need more calcium for plant growth & development, even though the pH is above neutral.

 

 

 The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Calcium Products Storage Addition

Calcium Products has broken ground on it's third expansion in less than 2 years!

The new expansion will additional 98G storage, an additional 98G load out, and room for an additional pellet plant in the future. The addition is scheduled to be completed by the end of this year and operational for the Spring fertilizer run.

"Not only will this addition will allow us to load out trucks faster, it will give us opportunity to make custom products for our customers", stated Larry Moore, President of Calcium Products."

While this addition will give Calcium Products more storage it will not solve the lack of trucks during the fertilizer season. We also have programs in place to help our dealer expand their storage so they can be sure to have enough 98G or SO4 on hand.

If you have questions about increasing your storage contact your sales rep or give me a call!

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Boron Update

Target Boron Levels

Depending on the crop, but for corn, shoot for 20 ppm in the soil. I have talked with many consultants in the past week and 5 ppm should be plenty. Boron can have negative impacts on soil biology when it gets to high. Many soils routinely test less than 5 ppm and in many cases under 1 ppm.

 

Read the whole article here http://www.calciumproducts.com/component/k2/item/434-boron-micronutrient-macro-benefit

 

 

 The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Dr. Borlaug we owe you our thanks

I (Glen) learned on Sunday that Dr. Norman Borlaug had died after a long battle with cancer.  http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/14/business/energy-environment/14borlaug.html

Dr. Borlaug, who was widely credited with saving hundreds of millions of people from starvation, upended conventional wisdom among scientists of his era both by the way he created super strains of wheat that have since spread across much of the developing world, and by proving that the world’s harvests can grow faster than the human population. His breeding techniques are now routinely embraced by the world’s biggest seed companies and by some estimates have created billions of dollars of crop value. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970.

Growing up as an Iowa farm boy, there were several people that I used as example, including Roswell Garst, Henry Wallace & Norman Borlaug. All were great people, but Dr. Borlaug did it on a huge scale & taught me that perseverance will overcome. 

Our world continues to need all the food we can grow, and to use it all efficiently. Dr. Borlaug taught me that production efficiency and environmental quality go hand in hand. 

Thank you, Dr. Borlaug.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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Sodium, salinity & soil, Not A Good Combination

Does your soil need a salt shaker?  Probably not, although it can happen through application of manure and/or byproducts that may contain sodium (Na) or excess salt (salinity), and through irrigation water.

Sodium has a dispersive effect on soil clays.  It can cause the clay particles to separate from each other, the particles will clog the soil pores, and cause a thin layer of slowly permeable material near the soil surface.  This effect is more serious in fine-textured soils than in coarse textured.  Soils with a high water table or poor drainage are more susceptible to salt or sodium accumulation.

Salinity can make plants work harder.  They must expend more energy to extract water from the soil.  Excess salinity can retard cell enlargement and division, as well as the production of proteins.  

Visible crop injury symptoms, such as leaf burn, are likely to occur only at high salinity levels.  However, yield losses can occur at lower levels, depending on the crop's sensitivity.  Corn & alfalfa are classified as "moderately sensitive", while soybeans are classified as "moderately tolerant."

Have more questions?  Start with a soil test.  If you or your agronomist suspect this may be involved, then talk with the lab where the samples are going.  I recommend Midwest Labs (www.midwestlabs.com), but most labs will be able to help you with this.  They may have specific guidelines that they recommend following to help you identify what is going on.

 

 

The Blogronomist is maintained by Craig Dick, head blogronomist and VP of Sales and Marketing. Here you will find a wide array of blog articles from Craig and expert guests on topics related to soil and crop health, farming, and so much more. If it’s not here, ask us!

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