Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: September 2010
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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: September 2010

FSF - Lock, Stock, and Barrel

 

Pheasant Hunting Season opens in Iowa this weekend. With harvest near complete many will be out enjoying the weather and wildlife. I thought a saying that refencnes guns was fitting.

LOCK, STOCK, AND BARREL
 
Meaning: The whole thing.
 
Origin: It’s been suggested that this phrase refers to all of a shopkeeper's possessions - the stock in trade, the items stored in barrels and the lock to the door. This explanation is entirely fanciful though - the 'whole thing' in question when this phrase originated was a musket. Muskets were composed of three parts:
 
  • The lock, or flintlock, which is the firing mechanism. Various forms of 'lock' muskets were used from the 1400s onwards, e.g. firelocks, flintlocks, matchlocks etc. The term 'lock' was probably adopted because the mechanism resembles a door lock.
  • The stock, which is the wooden butt-end of the gun. 'Stock' is the old term for wooden butt or stump and is a generic term for a solid base. 
  • The barrel, i.e. a cylindrical object, is an even older word and was well-established by the 15th century. This is the least obvious of these three terms to have been chosen to name a musket part. After all, in the 15th century people would have been very familiar with barrels as the squat coopered tubs used for storage - hardly similar to the parallel-sided cylindrical tubes that were used in muskets. It may have been that the term migrated from cannons or other sorts of gun which were more barrel-shaped.
 
Given the antiquity of the three words that make up the phrase and the fact that guns have been in use since at least the Hundred Years' War in 1450, and even earlier in other countries e.g. China, we might expect it to be very old. In fact it isn't particularly; the earliest use of it appears to come from around the beginning of the 19th century. 
 
Found in the USA in July 1803 in The Connecticut Centinel. The newspaper included a letter that reported on a celebration of the 4th of July, in the town of Stratford. The 30 men present carried a 'huge keg of rum' around the town and then drank toasts with 'full bumpers' [glasses filled to the brim] to:
1st: The 4th of July, 1776, the birthday of our ninepence... 
2nd: Jefferson, Paine, Gallatin and all the rest... 
[...]
6th: Patriotism - Self interest, the cock, lock, stock and barrel.
[and so on...]
 
After the 13th toast the records peter out, remarking that the company was 'over zealous' and 'celebrated all night'. The participants might have been 'feeling no pain' and possibly recalled little detail the next morning, but the writer seems to have noted the events precisely. His usage is clearly figurative rather than literal and as such is the earliest use of the phrase that I am aware of.
 
The inclusion of 'cock' [the firing hammer] lends additional weight to the argument that the allusion is to firearms. The colloquial use and lack of any explanation suggests that the phrase was in circulation in the USA in 1803 and earlier citations may well be found.
 
Rudyard Kipling came close to giving us a definition of the term in 1891, in Light That Failed:
"The whole thing, lock, stock, and barrel, isn't worth one big yellow sea-poppy."
 
Source: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/lock-stock-and-barrel.html
 
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Fall 2010 Sulfur Prices

 Our recent work with the Iowa Soybean Association on sulfur strip trials has me thinking about sulfur fertilizer. Past research trials by Iowa State on sulfur fertilizer for corn in northeast Iowa show positive results about 100% of the time on sands, 70% of the time on silt loam soils, 60% of the time on loam soils.


It seems that the word is getting out as the cost of sulfur fertilizers is on the rise. Recent prices on elemental sulfur are in the $0.32 - $0.45/# range or $0.35 to $0.50/# of actual S. But since it has to oxidize down to gypsum to be plant available it really is a big waste of money at any price, not just when it’s high. 

Ammonium Sulfate (AMS) is in the $0.20 to $0.30/# range or $0.83 to $1.25 /# of actual sulfur, not considering the nitrogen or the limestone needed to offset the acidity if causes.

SuperCal SO4 will cost you $0.09 to $0.11/# or $0.52 to $0.65/# of actual sulfur, not considering the calcium.

This fall and next spring make sure you have sulfur in your fertilizer program. Make sure it’s in a form that works, and make sure your not paying too much. Not all sulfur forms are the same some can cost you more upfront and yield in the end! 

 

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ 

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  • Published in Soybeans

ISA On-Farm Network Testing SuperCal SO4

The Iowa Soybean Assoication On-Farm Network has joined with Calcium Products to conducted replicated strip trials of SuperCal SO4. The trials will be looking at the sulfur response from SuperCal SO4.

Go to http://www.isafarmnet.com/protocols.html to learn more about conducting an SO4 trial!

SuperCal SO4 provides 17% sulfur in the sulfate form. It doesn't cause soil acidity and is plant avialable nutrition for your crops!

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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FDF- Till the Cows Come Home

 

 

TIL THE COWS COME HOME

Meaning: For a long but indefinite time.
 
Origin: Cows are notoriously languid creatures and make their way home at their own unhurried pace. That's certainly the imagery behind 'till the cows come home' or 'until the cows come home', but the precise time and place of the coining of this colloquial phrase isn't known. 
 
In Portuguese there is a current expression in these terms: "Deixe os patos passar". It means word by word: Let the ducks go by or pass along.
 
This is an ironical expression, whereby someone suggests that something will happen but certainly in a time that will never really come. The origin is probably from a fable in which a king promises to release a young man from death if he is able to tell him a never-ending story. And the astute young man tells a tale of ducks passing along in a stream. One duck follows the other, and the ducks never stop coming. So the story never reaches the end. Waiting for all the ducks to pass means waiting for ever.
 
Source: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/382900.html
 
Farm Sayings Friday is weekly feature of Yield Starts Here. You might think your grandparents made it up, but that old saying likely goes back many years. In this feature we will figure out who said it first and what it really means! Do you have a well used saying in your family, send to us and we'll feature it in a future blog.
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
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Chicken Manure Better when Pelletized

 A new study shows more benefits of pelletzing.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101117161248.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+sciencedaily+(ScienceDaily:+Latest+Science+News)

In a study from the University of Delaware that examined estrogen concentrations runoff from agricultural fields fertilized with chicken manure found that it is as much about the application of the manure as it is about the measurement of the types of estrogen.

It measured and compared the amounts of both toxic, free forms of estrogen hormones and less toxic species found in runoff. Corn was planted as a cover crop and chicken manure was applied in either a pelletized form or a raw litter form. Reduced tillage and no tillage treatments were also employed. Samples of surface runoff were collected after 10 rain storms during the 2008 summer growing season from April through July.

Sudarshan Dutta, the author of the study, found that the amounts of estrogen were lower in plots fertilized with pelletized manure and plots that received no-tillage treatments.

Here are two good resources for pelletized chicken manure:

http://www.chickitydoodoo.com/

http://www.perdueagrirecycle.com/

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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FSF - Harvest Moon

 

 

 

HARVEST MOON

Ok, so I missed this month’s full moon by a week, but technically I missed the Harvest Moon by a month.

Meaning: The harvest moon is the moon at or about the period of fullness that is nearest to the autumnal equinox. The harvest moon is often mistaken for the modern day hunter's moon.

Origin:  All full moons rise around the time of sunset. In general the moon rises about 50 minutes later each day. As it moves in orbit around Earth, the Harvest Moon and Hunter's Moon are special because, around the time of these half moons, the time difference between moonrise on successive evenings is shorter than usual. This means that the moon rises approximately 30 minutes later from one night to the next, as seen from about 40 degrees N. or S. latitude. Thus, there is no long period of darkness between sunset and moonrise around the time following these full moons. In times past this feature of these autumn moons was said to help farmers working to bring in their crops (or, in the case of the Hunter's Moon, hunters tracking their prey). They could continue being productive by moonlight even after the sun had set. Hence the name Harvest Moon.

The harvest moon comes soon before or soon after the autumnal equinox. It is simply the full moon closest to that equinox. About once every four years it occurs in October (in the northern hemisphere), depending on the cycles of the moon. Currently, the latest the harvest moon can occur is on October 7. When the night of the harvest moon coincides with the night of the equinox, it is called a "Super Harvest Moon." In 2010 in the contiguous United States, the harvest moon happened in the early morning hours of Sept 23, only 5 1/2 hours after the autumnal equinox, creating the first Super Harvest Moon since 1991.

Why does the Harvest Moon seem larger? The apparent larger size is because the brain perceives a low-hanging moon to be larger than one that's high in the sky. This is known as a moon illusion and it can be seen with any full moon. It can also be seen with constellations; in other words, a constellation viewed low in the sky will appear bigger than when it is high in the sky.

 In American myth and folklore the full moon of each month is given a name. There are many variations, but the following list gives the most widely known names in the modern US:

January – Wolf moon, Hunger moon, Old moon

February – Snow moon, Ice moon

March – Worm moon, Sap moon, Sugaring moon, Crow moon, Storm moon

April – Pink moon, Egg moon, Grass moon, Rain moon, Growing moon, Wind Moon

May – Flower moon, Planting moon, Milk moon, Hare moon

June – Strawberry moon, Rose moon, Honey moon, Mead moon

July – Buck moon, Thunder moon, Deer moon, Hay moon

August – Sturgeon moon, Corn moon, Fruit moon, Barley moon

September – Harvest moon  Gypsy Moon

October – Hunter's moon

November – Beaver moon, Frosty moon, Snow moon

December – Cold moon, Long Night moon, Winter moon

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  • Published in Soybeans

Kip Culler's New Soybean record

"

 In case you missed it over at DTN, Kip Cullers breaks another soybean yield record 160.6 bushels per acre!

Way to go Kip!

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

"
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  • Published in Calcium

Wet soils require extra nutrients for high yields

How will all the excess moisture from this growing season affect your fertility plans?
 
Did you know that wet soils can cause deficnecies in nutrients other than Nitogens?
 
Here is some excerpts from an article written by Neil Kinsey 
...excess moisture has caused some fertilizer nutrients needed for good crop production to be leached out, washed downward out of the topsoil. This is especially true for nitrogen, sulfur and
boron, which is generally expected to be the case with highly active soil water systems. But often overlooked is the loss of calcium, which is another element that can be lost from higher rates of moisture.
 
But just applying some type of lime to correct the pH is not the best answer. In fact, some of the fields that have received high magnesium (dolomite) lime can still have an adequate pH and yet be limiting your crop yields.
 
When dolomite is applied in too large a quantity, it can cause an excess of magnesium and have a negative effect on yields. In corn, on medium to heavy soils, a high level of magnesium (above 15 percent) costs the farmer 10 bushels of corn per acre. Above 20 percent magnesium on the soil test reduces the yield by another 5 or more bushels per acre. In addition, it will require more nitrogen to produce each bushel of corn every year until the problem is corrected. In legumes, taking soybeans as an example, 13 to 14 percent magnesium levels can cause losses of 10 bushels per acre per year, even when all other nutrients are present in the proper amounts.
 
For more information on wet soils http://blog.calciumproducts.com/posts/how-floods-affect-soil.cfm
 
Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .
 
 
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FSF Indian Summer

 

 

INDIAN SUMMER

Meaning: An unseasonably warm, dry and calm weather, usually following a period of colder weather or frost in the late Autumn.

Origin: Indian summer is first recorded in Letters From an American Farmer, a 1778 work by the French-American soldier turned farmer J. H. St. John de Crèvecoeur (a.k.a. Michel-Guillaume-Jean de Crèvecoeur): "Then a severe frost succeeds which prepares it to receive the voluminous coat of snow which is soon to follow; though it is often preceded by a short interval of smoke and mildness, called the Indian Summer."
 
The English already had names for the phenomenon - St. Luke’s Summer, St. Martin’s Summer or All-Hallown Summer, In Galicia (northern Spain), it is called Veraniño de San Martiño, and in Portugal it is called "Verão de São Martinho," both of which refer to St. Martin's summer. In Welsh, it is known as "Haf Bach Mihangel" or (St.) Michael's Little Summer - St. Michael's Day being on 29 September. In Lithuania this time is called "Bobu vasara", which translates to "summer of old ladies"
 
In Russia, Poland, Ukraine, Czech Republic,  and in Croatia it is called Women's Summer/Babye Leto. In Bulgaria, the phenomenon is sometimes called "Gypsy Summer", and in some places "Gypsy Christmas" and refers to unseasonably warm weather in late fall, or a warm spell in between cold periods. 
 
In Sweden it is called "brittsommar", which is derived from Birgitta and Britta, who have their "name day" in the Swedish calendar on October 7. That is when Britt Mass, an official fall open-air market, was held.
 
In Germany and Austria it is called "Altweibersommer", in Hungary "vénasszonyok nyara" (Old Ladies' Summer or Crone's Summer) because the many white spiders seen at this time of the year have been associated with the norns of Norse folklore or medieval witches. In Flanders (Belgium) it is also called "Oudewijvenzomer" (Old Ladies' Summer) or "Trezekeszomer" ("St-Theresa's Summer -- St-Theresa's Day being on 15 October). 
 
In Latvia this period is called "Atvasara", which translates to "re-summer" or "return/repeat/flashback of summer". In Turkey the term "pastirma yazi", meaning Pastrami Summer is used.
 
These have now all but disappeared and, like the rest of the world, the term Indian summer has been used in the UK for at least a century.
 
Why Indian? Well, no one knows but, as is commonplace when no one knows, many people have guessed. Here are a few of the more commonly repeated guesses:
When European settlers first came across the phenomenon in America it became known as the Indian's Summer.
The haziness of the Indian Summer weather was caused by prairie fires deliberately set by Native American tribes.
It was the period when First Nations/Native American peoples harvested their crops.
The phenomenon was more common in what were then North American Indian territories.
It relates to the marine shipping trade in the Indian Ocean (this is highly dubious as it is entirely remote from the early US citations).
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Testimonial

Gene Zimmerman with Quality Soil Nutrition, Sheldon Wisconsin was kind enough to send us another picture of SuperCal SO4. Gene has been having tremendous success with weed suppression in forages by using SuperCal SO4. See for yourself!

GZ Boat field

See other testimonials here.

Thanks for the photos Gene!

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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