Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: November 2011
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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: November 2011

Poor Wheat Tillering Due to Aluminum Toxicity

 

We thought you should be aware of a good article released by the Plant Management Network, originally written by K-State, entitled Poor Wheat Tillering, Root Development May be Due to Aluminum Toxicity.


From the Artilce:

“…the producer should make a note of this condition (low pH/Aluminum Toxicity) and take action before planting another crop on that field. Lime application on low-pH soil should be considered a high priority. Even half-rates of lime will do some good,”  Dr. Diaz said.


“Aluminum toxicity begins to occur where soil pH levels are less than 5.0 and potassium chloride-extractable free aluminum levels are greater than 25 parts per million, Ruiz Diaz said. Some varieties of wheat, such as Everest and Overley, have better tolerance to low-pH soils and high aluminum levels than other varieties, such as Fuller. The symptoms of aluminum toxicity include poor tillering and sometimes, but not always, a purplish color, he said. “In addition, older leaves may appear drought stressed and withered. Plants will either be stunted throughout the season even with adequate moisture and nitrogen, or may even die,” he said. High concentrations of aluminum will reduce development of the roots, giving them a short stubby appearance. “The roots will often have a brownish color, and the root tips may have a burned appearance. This effect on roots will limit nutrient uptake, and plants may show some deficiency symptoms even with good nutrient levels,” Ruiz Diaz said. In addition, low soil pH (below 5.0) can reduce the availability of plant nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and potassium.”

 

We couldn’t agree more, the following pictures is what happens to the roots when aluminum toxicity is a problem.


Here is what aluminum does  to the root hair tips


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Anderson’s to close their Fairmont, IL facility

On December 13th the Anderson’s announced in a letter to their customers that they “elected to cease production of pelletized products at our Fairmount, Illinois facility.”

This is a big surprise since they closed the plant in spring of 2010 for repairs and upgrades. That closure caused wide spread shortage of pelletized lime and pelletized gypsum in the spring of 2010.

Many suppliers upon hearing such news would raise their prices 20-30%. Calcium Products will be keeping its current spring pricing in place. Though we strongly encourage all our dealers to contact their sales reps to plan out their spring needs. History has shown that when this plant is not operating there is a shortage of product in the market place. We are committed to ensuring our customers that prepay, that they will have good product supply for spring.

The one thing that we have going for us is we have some advanced warning of the shortage. We plan on running all plants at full capacity to try and meet the demand but storage is limited. We are working to find additional storage at satellite warehouses and with dealers. Those that can take product early are strongly encouraged to do so.

Read more...

Four hour shutdown at Fort Dodge plant on 12/27/11

Our Fort Dodge plant is expected to be offline on December 27, 2011, from 8 a.m. until noon due to an electricity outage. There will be no loading and the plant will not be able to receive or make phone calls. Thank you for your patience and understanding as we work to get things up and running as quickly as possible.

Please also take note of our holiday hours for all of our facilities:

 

We will close Friday, Dec 23 at 5 p.m. and reopen at 5 a.m. on  Dec 27.

We will close Friday, Dec 30 at 5 p.m. and reopen at 5 a.m. on Jan 3.

Thanks for your understanding. Have a Merry Christmas and Happy New Years!

 

 

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Women, food & ag conference in Des Moines

 We wanted to pass on some info on a January event that sounds fabulous — "Women Transforming the Landscape" is the 2012 Women, Food & Agriculture Network's annual conference. This year it's Jan. 20-21 in Des Moines and includes a keynote by Debra Eschmeyer, program director of FoodCorps. The conference includes a progressive dinner at some local restaurants and a great local winery.

Definitely sounds like a great event. Check it out or share it with women you know who may be interested!

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Is your turf protected for the winter?

It’s not too late to winterize your turf and protect it from the harmful effects of the winter climate. If your turf is not properly prepared for the harsh winter climates it is going to struggle to re-establish this Spring when it comes out of dormancy.

Did you know that gypsum is the perfect winterizer. If you are not applying gypsum to your lawn before the first day of winter you are really placing undo harm to the turf. Gypsum creates a great enviroment for your turf to go into dormancy. It creates soil structure that allows space for the roots, increases the water holding capacity of the soil so the turf doesn’t go thirsty and it provides an area for maximum oxygen intake for the plant. While all these are great reason to apply gypsum to your turf, the most important reason to apply gypsum before the first day of winter is because of it amazing ability to provide protection against the copius amounts of salt and winter de-icers we apply to our sidewalks, driveways and parking lots. These are the products that not only keep us safe but “burn” the turf in the spring.

If the excess sodium levels are removed from the rootzone, your turf has an excellent chance of survival in the spring. When gypsum is applied the calcium in the gypsum preps the soil for the turf to survive and the sulfur bonds to the sodium  from the salts and de-icers products and flushes the sodium out of the root zone into the sub-soil where it cannot be harmful to the plant.

Give gypsum a try, your turf will thank you for it and your neighbors will wonder why your turf appearance is better than theirs in April and May.

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Review of Canada Meetings

Last week I spent 2 days in Alberta doing meetings in support of our new exclusive distributor for western Canada ENR . You likely won’t believe it but it was actually warmer in Canada than it was in Iowa!

 
We had two one-day meetings, one in Stettler, and one in Lethbridge. We had over a 100 farmers at each meeting and a half a dozen dealers. In addition to the McRea staff, we had a representative from Glen Dale Agra Services Ltd. out of British Columbia, among other dealers.
 
Doug McRea lead off the meeting discussing the various types of fertilizers and where they were best suited for. Many farmers are unware that different fertilizer actually have different effects in the soil.
 
I discussed calcium, sulfur and pH related issues. You can view both presentations at the following links.
 
Jarrett Chambers with ATP Nutrition rounded out the program. ATP is doing some interesting things with foliars and nutritionals. This is a company you will want to keep and eye on!
 
One thing I learned at this meeting is what mineral deficiency this corn is showing?
 
 
This picture was taken near Blue Earth Minnesota. In addition to the small ears the corn was lodged. 
 
In the following picture, 300# of SuperCal SO4 was applied broadcast
 
Go back to the first picture, no it’s not sulfur or calcium. Give up? It took me listening to Jarrett’s presentation and seeing his magnesium deficiency pictures to know that we were seeing magnesium deficiency. Why didn’t we know it right away? The soil had over 25% base saturation magnesium, it shouldn’t be magnesium deficiency.
 
My new friend and consultant Geoff Doell, who I meet at the meeting, had the answer, magnesium protein channels or membrane channel. These channels are what protect the plant from overdosing on a nutrient when it is in too high a level. This defense mechanism was sensing the high magnesium levels and was keeping the channels into the plant closed. We will jump into this further in another blog! For now we can simply say that increasing the calcium was enough to allow the plant to take in enough magnesium to grow a strong root system and big ears.
 
Doubt that high mag soils can be a problem, why would the University of Florida engineer plants to grow on the high mag soils of Mars if it wasn’t an issue? 
 
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Humates. What are they? Should they be in your fertility program?

Humates and humic acids are certianly nothing new, in fact, humates are millions of years old. They are organic matter in an advanced state of decay. Humates have passed through the stages of compost and peat but have not yet become coal.

Here is a great informational sheet describing the benefits of humates: Humic Info Sheet

If you are not currently using humates and/or humic acids you need to consider adding this powerful soil amendment to your fertility program.

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The Anderson's to close their Fairmount, IL facility

On December 13, the Anderson's announced in a letter to their customers "we have elected to cease production of pelletized products at our Fairmount, Illinois facility."

This is a big surprise since they closed the plant in spring of 2010 for repairs and upgrades. That closure caused wide spread shortage of pelletized lime and pelletized gypsum in the spring of 2010.

Many suppliers upon hearing such news would raise their prices 20-30%. Calcium Products will be keeping its current spring pricing in place though we strongly encourage all our dealers to contact their sales reps to plan out their spring needs. History has shown that when this plant is not operating there is a shortage of product in the market place. We are committed to ensuring our customers that prepay will have good product supply for spring.

The one thing we have going for us is we have some advanced warning of the shortage. We plan on running all our plants at full capacity to try and meet the demand but storage is limited. We are working to find additional storage at satellite warehouses and with dealers. Those that can take product early are strongly encouraged to do so.

Please let us know if you have any questions.

 

Yield Starts Here is a blog for farmers, focusing on increasing yield and profitability by focusing on the soil. It is managed by Craig Dick, a Blogronomist and Sales and Marketing Manager at Calcium Products. Find other articles by Craig and guest writers at http://blog.calciumproducts.com/ .

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We're proud to support the Practical Farmers of Iowa conference!

We wanted to share a news release for the upcoming Practical Farmers of Iowa conference. We're a major sponsor and would love to see you. Get registered now! Learn more:

Registration Opens for Practical Farmers of Iowa 2012 Annual Conference

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