Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: June 2017
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Calcium Products - Items filtered by date: June 2017

Mikel Scholten, Territory Sales Manager | South Dakota | North Dakota

Mikel Scholten joined the Calcium Products team in 2017 and is responsible for North Dakota and South Dakota. Mikel has worked in the sales industry for 15 years, with experience ranging from the medical field to the agriculture industry. Most recently, she has specialized in sales and support of inoculants and in-furrow seed treatments for Rosen’s Diversified Inc. Mikel graduated from Northern State University in 1999 with a degree in biology and with minors in chemistry and psychology. In 2003, she received her Master of Business Administration and a Masters of Management from the University of Mary. Mikel grew up on a diversified crop and livestock farm in South Dakota and she currently resides in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

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Aerification and SO4

Golf Ball on Aerified Turf

Aerification contributes to healthy turf

The most scrutinized word in the professional turf industry might be aerification. If golfers arrive to the course and see a “plinko” board on the putting surfaces, they immediately assume that their experience for the day is going to be ruined. This doesn’t have to be the case. Sure, it may not look good but that doesn’t mean they won’t play good.

Consider a story I heard about Tom Watson, eight-time major champion. Tom arrived at his home course and shot a course record 58, just days after the greens had been aerified.

What golfers don’t realize but superintendents do is that aerification is a necessary practice to provide the healthiest turf possible. This is a short-term disruption that has long-term benefits. The GCSAA explains the aerification process achieves three important objectives:
1. It relieves soil compaction.
2. It provides a method to improve the soil mixture around the highest part of a green’s roots.
3. It reduces accumulation of excess thatch.

Healthy roots demand oxygen. In good soil, the roots get oxygen from tiny pockets of air trapped between soil and sand particles. During the aerification process, cores of compacted soil and excess thatch are removed, allowing for the infusion of oxygen, and water to bring a resurgence of growth. The holes are then filled with sand via topdressing. Adding the sand helps the soil retain air space and makes it easier for the roots to grow through the profile. Topdressing can also prevent an excess of thatch from becoming established.

Introduce SO4 pelletized gypsum during aerification

Aerification is the perfect opportunity to introduce SO4 pelletized gypsum in the process. Once the topdressing is complete, the next step is to broadcast SO4, then drag or broom in the sand and SO4.

Having a high quality, highly soluble form of dihydrate gypsum – such as SO4 – allows the calcium and sulfur to be plant available quickly, providing a much-needed boost to the soil and plant heath after a very stressful procedure. By adding calcium, it can help dislodge any accumulated sodium in the soil profile, which can then be leached away with irrigation or rain. Calcium is also important for soil structure, ensuring adequate pore space for oxygen, water, and root growth. Sulfur helps provide deep green color to the turf, improves density, and can increase drought tolerance and winter hardiness.

The bottom line is that aerification is necessary for healthy turf and incorporating SO4 can enhance the benefits and aid in a speedier recovery.

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Localized Dry Spot

Localized Dry Spot

What is localized dry spot?

With an unusually hot start to the late spring/summer season, localized dry spot (LDS) is showing up earlier and more vigorously than normal. LDS shows up as somewhat randomized, dry looking areas of turf. It is generally seen on sand-based greens, but can occur on other turfs that have been heavily topdressed with sand over the years. Sand-based soil has greater propensity for hydrophobic conditions, which is the main sign of LDS.

What causes localized dry spot?
The deeper cause, beyond sand-based soils, are believed to be organic acids and residue that coat the soil or sand particles. These organic compounds are not completely understood, but are the result of typical decomposition of leaf tissue, roots, fungal biomass and organic soil amendments included in the original root zone mix. These compounds tend to have a hydrophobic nature and once they have coated soil particles, lead to LDS. Combine this hydrophobicity with root growth stoppage in heat and soils that already have low moisture holding capacity, and the problem can become bad in a hurry.

How to manage localized dry spot
While there is plentiful research into the causes and potential areas that could be managed differently to delay or correct LDS, the primary management technique has been and continues to be the use of wetting agents or surfactants to allow water to re-infiltrate areas that develop hydrophobicity.

There are several different chemical groups in the wetting agent and surfactant world, but the goal of all of these products is to lower the surface tension of water so it can infiltrate the hydrophobic soil. It pays to do your homework on the types of products available in the market to determine which one will provide you with the best result. Some of the older chemistries can cause phytotoxic effects on plants, so make sure you fully understand what you’ve got before spraying it on your greens.

Be prepared
Unfortunately, there doesn’t exist today a ‘silver bullet’ to cure LDS. The best strategy is to incorporate existing knowledge into new construction and for existing problems, to know when it’s coming and be prepared with a wetting agent or surfactant strategy to minimize the damage and interruption in play. Be sure to know what your local extension has to say about LDS management in your specific area.

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Natural vs. Synthetic Gypsum

Synthetic Gypsum

What is Gypsum?
Gypsum is a mineral that has been used in agriculture for a long time. Its chemical name is calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO4 • 2H2O). It provides a sulfur source in the plant available form, sulfate, and provides calcium – both essential nutrients in crop production.

SO4 is naturally mined gypsum
SO4 is pelletized from gypsum that is naturally mined in northwest Iowa. Gypsum deposits were left behind when inland seas that used to cover Iowa dried up and receded.

Synthetic gypsum is a byproduct of burning coal
In contrast, synthetic gypsum (photo above) is a byproduct of burning coal. This source is commonly referred to as synthetic or flue gas desulfurized (FGD) gypsum. Power plants have ‘scrubbers’ that control emissions from their flue stacks. The process in its entirety is called flue gas desulfurization.

In short, these scrubbers filter by forcing sulfur dioxide and calcium carbonate (limestone) to react with one another, which creates calcium sulfite (CaSO3). Most power plants also use an additional step called ‘forced oxidation,’ whereby the calcium sulfite is oxidized to calcium sulfate, or synthetic gypsum. The resulting moist material is either landfilled or used in various industries around the U.S. – wallboard for instance. 

Challenges with synthetic gypsum
There are a few challenges with synthetic gypsum worth considering:
1. Coal contains heavy metals, which are generally isolated in the scrubbing process but occasionally can end up in the synthetic gypsum, raising obvious concerns about agricultural applications.
2. In bulk form, the material contains high moisture levels, making it difficult to spread and manage. As a result, recommended application rates are in the 1,000+ lbs/A range, which can create imbalance in the soil. These rates lack scientific evidence supporting their use in Midwest agriculture.
3. The purity of synthetic gypsum is only as good as the starting feedstock (limestone) and the system that produces it, creating highly variable chemical characteristics. Because of its synthetic/by-product nature, it will never be registered for organic use.

Synthetic gypsum is difficult and expensive to pelletize due to its fine particle size and requires the use of specialized binders and additives. This results in slow breakdown and activity in the field.

In summary, natural gypsum is mined from the earth while synthetic gypsum is a byproduct of burning coal. SO4 is pelletized, natural gypsum. It’s consistent pellet size allows it to blended and applied with other dry fertilizers.

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Calcium Products Celebrates 30 Years

Golf Outing

Calcium Products is celebrating 30 years in business this summer! This milestone leads us to look back on our history with gratefulness, while strengthening our focus on the future.

We want to thank you, our customers, for your business and loyalty throughout the last 30 years. Whether you’ve worked with us for one year or all 30, we genuinely appreciate your support of Calcium Products.

Without our employees, none of our success would be possible. We want to thank and acknowledge them for all their hard work over the years. We are fortunate to have a team that is talented and dedicated to creating a positive customer experience. In June, we hosted an all company golf outing to celebrate our 30 years. (Photo above.)

As we look to the future, we’re committed to creating high-quality products that assist in progressive farming and turfgrass management practices, as well as building long-term relationships with our customers. We currently have plans in place to grow our sales team and add additional production capacity to support our future sales growth. We believe this combination will deliver success for Calcium Products and our customers throughout the next 30 years.

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